Seymour Lake Lithium Project

100% owned Seymour Lake Lithium Project is located in Ontario, Canada. 

Background

The project has over 4,000m of historic drilling from 2002 and 2009.  Recent exploration and drilling has found that the lithium mineralisation is hosted in extensive outcropping spodumene-bearing pegmatite structures with widths up to 30m and grades of up to 6.01% Li2O.  In addition historical results show tantalum and beryllium grades of up to 1,180 ppm (Ta2O5) and 1,270ppm (BeO) respectively were intersected.

Mapping and sampling programs by Ardiden successfully confirmed historical data and dramatically expanded the potential strike length of the previously drilled pegmatites up to 5km, further enhancing the previously delineated new pegmatite structures – all of which are located at or near surface. As a result of the early exploration and mapping success, Ardiden significantly expanded the Seymour Lake Project from the original five claims area totalling 923 Ha in two expansion phases. The Company staked an additional 29 claim areas, increasing the project area to 7,019 Ha.  

Due to the continued identification of the multiple pegmatite exposures throughout Seymour Lake Project, Ardiden expanded the land-holding south and east in the project to cover these newly identified pegmatite structures and potential mineralisation extensions. The new claims will allow the Ardiden geological team to continue the mapping and exploration program.

The new claims to the east side of the project were not only staked for the pegmatite potential but, given the number of faults, dykes and shear zones along the granite formation, there is also a possibility of identifying base metals in the region. Historically, copper mineralisation was identified within the southern portion of the new claim areas.  

 

Seymour Lake Project overview showing new pegmatite exposures, faults and dykes and the newly staked claim areas.

Due Diligence Drill Program

The due diligence drilling program in May 2016 successfully intersected spodumene-bearing pegmatite structures at the Seymour Lake Lithium Project which meant that Ardiden only needed to complete six diamond drill holes, for a total of 281 drilled metres. The limited and targeted due diligence drilling program was completed to twin or validate historical drill holes and to provide sufficient drill core samples in order to undertake full metallurgical analysis.

The initial logging of the drill holes has immediately confirmed the strong presence of spodumene at the Seymour Lake Project, with more than 50% of the drill core (142m) being readily identified as spodumene pegmatite. A review of the drill core has shown that each drill hole intersection contains substantial zones of spodumene pegmatite, many near surface with down-hole widths of mineralisation up to 30m, which is a very encouraging result for Ardiden. The assay results included several thick intercepts of spodumene-lithium mineralisation with all 150 drill core samples from the program showing various grades of lithium, including an exceptional grade of 5.4% Lithium Oxide (Li2O).

Drill core from the due diligence drilling at North Aubry prospect

 
Resource Delineation Drill Program

In October 2016, Ardiden commenced the maiden mineral resource delineation drill program comprising of 27 drill holes and 1,700 drilled metres with an initial focus on the North Aubry prospect. Strong assay results confirm the visual logging of the drill core and the potential to establish a maiden JORC 2012 Mineral Resource estimate for the Seymour Lake Project by Q2 2017.

Ardiden will seek to expand the initial maiden lithium resource in accordance with JORC (2012) guidelines at North Aubry in a number of stages once the other prospects along the first 1km of the overall 5km strike length are progressively drill tested next year. These prospects include Central Aubry, South Aubry and Pye.

Overview showing the pegmatite exposures at North Aubry prospects and interpreted extensions.

Due to the limited amount of drilling completed to date and the general complexity of the pegmatite mineralisation, it is still unknown how the pegmatites at these prospects relate to each other and what impact this will have on the delineation of the future lithium resources. 

Overview showing the pegmatite exposures at North Aubry prospects and interpreted extensions

The main pegmatite at the North Aubry prospect is hosted as a part of a vertically stacked series of gently dipping pegmatite sills, has so far been confirmed as being at least 250m wide and 300m long, and remains open in two or more directions.

Representative cross-section of North Aubry at 5585110mN showing the upper sill

The proximity of the pegmatites to surface at North Aubry prospect is also considered to be a strategic advantage, potentially allowing easier access to high-quality mineralisation in a future mining scenario, reducing the required pre-strip and resulting in a lower extraction cost and improved project economics.

Depending on future exploration and drilling results, the mineralisation at North Aubry may be amenable to extraction via a series of high grade-low strip boutique open pits.

Central Aubry Prospect

Initial drilling at the Central Aubry prospect has successfully intersected substantial multiple near-surface layers of pegmatite mineralisation of various widths, as seen in drill hole SL-16-68, which intersected a total of 16.48 metres of spodumene-bearing sills over a total down-hole width of 52m and drill hole SL-16-69, which intersected a total of 10.70 metres of spodumene-bearing sills over a total down-hole width of 52m.

The Central Aubry prospect is located approximately 500m south of the North Aubry prospect and about 200m north of the South Aubry prospect and is comprised of two main exposures. Mapping of the Central Aubry prospect shows strong presence of spodumene mineralisation over the majority of the exposures surface.

Once again, the proximity of the pegmatites to surface at the Central Aubry prospect is considered to be a strategic advantage, potentially allowing easier access to high-quality mineralisation in a future mining scenario, reducing the required pre-strip and resulting in a lower extraction cost and improved project economics.